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The Quotation Fallacy โ€œ๐Ÿ’ฌโ€


SoundEagle in the Court of Quotation

SoundEagle in the Court of Quotation

SoundEagle in ็–พ้ขจ็Ÿฅๅ‹่‰

SoundEagle in ็–พ้ขจ็Ÿฅๅ‹่‰

Dear Readers and Followers as well as Lovers and Collectors of Fine Quotes,

Once in a while, in moments of clarity, we may come to the realization that quotations are akin to opinions or views in that we are quoting ourselves or others to make certain statements for various purposes and occasions. Unfortunately, the ways in which people routinely handle or dispense opinions and quotations (whether of their own or others) are fraught with numerous problems, most of which elude peopleโ€™s awareness and acknowledgement. This post seeks to uncover and explain a wide range of these problems so that they can be avoided, alleviated or eliminated. Considering that a good quote can pointedly reflect or meaningfully project oneโ€™s worldview, attitude, intention or identity like a shining beacon or scintillating jewel, it does pays great dividend to quote well indeed.

In addition, presented here in style is a collection of potentially inspirational and thought-provoking quotes, chosen for you by SoundEagle.

Many of these quotes have reached us in the present from the distant past. For example, the first quote is a Chinese poem that has existed for more than one thousand years, and is available in several variations.

็–พ ้ขจ ็Ÿฅ ๅ‹ ่‰SoundEagle in ็–พ้ขจ็Ÿฅๅ‹่‰
ๆ˜ ๆ—ฅ ่พจ ่ช  ่‡ฃ
ๅ‹‡ ๅคซ ๅฎ‰ ่ญ˜ ็พฉ
ๆ™บ ่€… ๅฟ… ๆ‡ท ไป

The first line of the poem, โ€œ็–พ้ขจ็Ÿฅๅ‹่‰โ€, literally meaning โ€œStrong wind knows tough grassโ€, has already existed as an idiom as early as 23 AD. It can be translated more freely into English as โ€œThe storm puts strong grass to the testโ€, meaning that oneโ€™s true colours are revealed after a severe or daunting test. The whole poem edifies us that only the strong and sincere can bear hardship and turmoil; and that only the wise, not the valiant, can know righteousness and cherish benevolence.

The second quote is not only as ancient as the Roman Empire but also indeterminate as to its true source. Even though it has been credited to Marcus Aurelius, there are contentions as to its authenticity and authorship due to unresolved historical inconsistencies.

Life Cycle
Live a good life.

If there are gods and they are just, then they will not care how devout you have been, but will welcome you based on the virtues you have lived by.

If there are gods, but unjust, then you should not want to worship them.

If there are no gods, then you will be gone, but will have lived a noble life that will live on in the memories of your loved ones.

For those who are interested, please read Fabricated Marcus Aurelius Quote and Did Marcus Aurelius say โ€œLive a good lifeโ€?. Perhaps one could indeed take George Mikes more seriously when the Hungarian-born British writer, journalist and humourist uttered: โ€œI have made it a rule that whenever I say something stupid, I immediately attribute it to Dr Johnson, Marcus Aurelius or Dorothy Parker.โ€

A misquotation refers to an act, instance or occasion of quoting a person or a source incorrectly or inaccurately; or of attributing a quotation to the wrong author or incorrect source. In general, it is not always possible to determine or evaluate the accuracy of the source of a quote and the contexts in which the quote is created and used by the author or by other people. This limitation remains valid even when one has the luxury of consulting a database of quotations or an encyclopedia of quotes, where misquotations, if present, can spread rapidly due to the large number of online users relying on the database or encyclopedia on a daily basis. Edmark M. Law describes the predicament of ascertaining the authenticity of a quoteโ€™s origin in a comment addressed to SoundEagle as follows:

The origins of lots of quotations are difficult to pinpoint. People like to attribute clever quotes to Einstein, Twain, Wilde, etc. since this would look better than attributing them to some unknown nobody. Even authoritative sources like Oxford and Bartlettโ€™s contain a large number of mistakes. Quote Investigator (a website) is rather good since it tries to track down the origin of the quotes they investigate. Unfortunately, I have also found some errors there.

The biggest source of misinformation regarding quotes (and their origins) today is, of course, the Internet. You can find a huge number of misquotations and misattributions in social media and โ€œquotesโ€ websites

Thatโ€™s why when I post quotes, I seldom use a โ€œQuoteโ€ book or website as a reference. Normally, when I find an interesting passage from a book that I read, Iโ€™d quote it. Sometimes, when I see an interesting quote from a quote book, I try my best to find the original source. If I canโ€™t find the original source, then I most likely wonโ€™t post it.

Whether it would be easy or hard to find or cite the source of certain quotes, there exist other more important issues and considerations to be aware of than just those pertaining to misquotations. To begin with, there are valid and even compelling reasons for a discerning and reasonable person to conclude that, irrespective of the source and how a quote eventually comes to be known and used, the message of a quote (when correctly interpreted or understood) is more important than the messenger, whose public status, identity and fame or the lack thereof, as well as our knowledge and assumptions of them, plus the noise and travail of our existence and the hustle and bustle of our lives, can readily or even surreptitiously taint, usurp, prejudice or interfere with our reception and understanding of the message.

On the one hand, we are continually carried along by many psychological processes, mental habits and internal states, which can influence our judgements and decisions by stealth. Given that people are responsive beings whose current emotions (such as joy, pleasure, empathy, trust, pride, confidence, surprise, hope, fear, anger, anxiety, contempt and other conscious experience) habitually influence their decisions, it would be quite difficult to avoid the affect heuristic, a rapid, involuntary emotional response, a kind of mental shortcut described in Wikipedia as โ€œa subconscious process that shortens the decision-making process and allows people to function without having to complete an extensive search for information.โ€ In other words, it is a simple, efficient rule that people often intuitively use to form judgements and make decisions such that โ€œemotional response, or “affect” in psychological terms, plays a lead roleโ€, insofar as the human mind is deemed to be a cognitive miser โ€œdue to the tendency of humans to think and solve problems in simpler and less effortful ways rather than in more sophisticated and more effortful ways, regardless of intelligence.โ€ Furthermore, people are at the mercy of attribute substitution, which happens when they have โ€œto make a judgment (of a target attribute) that is computationally complex, and instead substitutes a more easily calculated heuristic attributeโ€ or stereotype. It is a psychological process that lies beneath a number of cognitive biases and perceptual illusions. Overall, people characteristically commit or experience attribution bias:

In psychology, an attribution bias or attributional bias is a cognitive bias that refers to the systematic errors made when people evaluate or try to find reasons for their own and others’ behaviors.[1][2][3] People constantly make attributions regarding the cause of their own and others’ behaviors; however, attributions do not always accurately reflect reality. Rather than operating as objective perceivers, people are prone to perceptual errors that lead to biased interpretations of their social world.[4][5]

On the other hand, we are often content with our many assumptions about other people and their endeavours based on their social status and physical attributes. All too often, if the messenger is known to be famous or deemed to be authoritative, we are far more likely to defer our better judgement, surrender our common sense, forsake our suspicion, suspend our scepticism, relinquish our intellectual autonomy, disregard the yardstick of logic, or throw caution to the wind through our admiration of, or alliance with, the messenger, believing that our use of such a quote and the eminence of its originator will automatically, inevitably or categorically impart significant credence and meaning to our own position, purpose and perspective. Lorenzo Pasqualis warns us about famous quotes and logical fallacies as follows:

Logical fallacies will show their ugly head in dialog during your career in tech, and life in general. Do not let that go! It will distort reality and introduce contradictions to supposedly logical arguments. People regularly repeat phrases and quotes as unquestionable truths, because some famous person said them in the past. Such phrases sound smart and are attached to famous names that we would not dare to question. People repeat those phrases because we are used to them, and we assume them to be true.

In so doing, we fail to assess the phrases and quotes on their respective merits, and thus simultaneously succumb to the genetic fallacy (also called the fallacy of origins or fallacy of virtue), which โ€œis a fallacy of irrelevance where a conclusion is suggested based solely on someone’s or something’s history, origin, or source rather than its current meaning or contextโ€, and to the halo effect, a form of cognitive bias and a specific type of confirmation bias, in which our overall impression of a famous person influences not only our thoughts and feelings about the personโ€™s character or attributes, but also our opinions and assessments of the personโ€™s writing or saying in quotes. Indeed, it is all too easy to use famous quotes as shields, excuses, pretexts or justifications to bolster a particular defence or standpoint, to reinforce certain kind of belief or reasoning, to relax the reigns on our follies or shortcomings, and to counter any qualms that we might have about specific acts or issues.

On the flip side, the relevance or significance of a quotation can be readily disparaged or tarnished by a mere reference to an infamous person, whose credibility or character is questionable. As a result, we run a great risk of dismissing any intrinsic value of the quotation summarily, unfairly or indiscriminately.

Adding even more caveats to using quotes is the ever-present author bias, which โ€œcan carry an understated or implied judgmentโ€, not to mention that an authorโ€™s opinion, agenda or subjectivity can significantly affect the content or discussion of an issue. In a comment addressed to SoundEagle, Keith, who is a client manager for a professional consulting firm, and also a blogger providing a source of โ€œ[i]ndependent views from someone who offers some historical contextโ€, concedes a similar point about the author of a quote playing a part in our reception or attitude towards the quote: โ€œwe have to guard against author bias. Sometimes, we may like a quote and then like it more when we discover the author. It also feeds part of our ego to be able to cite Mark Twain or Confucious [sic].โ€

For these reasons, the following quotes are allowed to stand alone with their full weights and implications carried by their contents alone, which readers and followers can appreciate without prior knowledge or preconception of the quotes’ creators. Moreover, these quotes have been chosen on the basis of their heuristic potentials and edificatory strengths as well as their veracity and validity.

Closer examination, deeper assessment and better reasoning have been applied in the process of selecting suitable quotes for inclusion as a collection here, given that quotes can come in many forms and flavours. SoundEagle has had to be vigilant and to realize that numerous quotes are characteristically subjective, biased, one-sided, tendentious or even invidious, if not significantly flawed, fallacious, specious or spurious. Fortunately, quotes can often be better understood or critiqued via analysis, comparison, logic, scoping and contextualization so that their limitations, idiosyncrasies or inconsistencies could be uncovered.

For instance, what might first appear to be very persuasive and highly sensible quotes could be inescapably self-contradictory, meaning that one can find quotes that are apparently reasonable on their own but are at odds with each other when put side by side, or when examined from other perspective(s). At the very least, one needs to concede the validity of the law of noncontradiction, which dictates that contradictory quotes or conflicting statements cannot both be true in the same sense at the same time (โ€˜Nothing can both be and not beโ€™), as well as the law of excluded middle, which mandates that for any proposition, either that proposition is true or its negation is true (โ€˜Everything must either be or not beโ€™). In short, some quotes that people use or encounter daily are quite circumscribed in their validities and reliabilities. Upon applying careful inspection and higher-level scrutiny, they can be revealed to be far from universally true and/or comprehensively applicable.

Of course, one can always retort or argue, by special pleading or committing the relativist fallacy (also called the subjectivist fallacy), that specific quotes are beyond scrutiny or immune to analysis; that some quotes are true for one person but not true for someone else; that particular quotes are always at the outer fringes of consensus or comprehension; that certain quotes are exceptions to generally accepted rules or principles even in the absence of reasonable explanations or valid justifications; that the meanings and currencies of quotes are always fluctuating as a result of being conditioned by culture and history, and thus are subject to biases and misinterpretations, even if rationality can be consistently strengthened or appealed to; that the relevance and quality of quotes are fundamentally filtered and moulded by class structures, social stratifications, cultural reproductions and communication frameworks; that various quotes and their significances are rooted in social constructivism, social constructionism and symbolic interactionism to the extent that all quotations are socially manufactured viewpoints and historically embedded extracts arising from the active, creative, subjective, strategic and intentional aspects of human beings, agencies and constructive potentials, and therefore are neither products of pure observations nor representations of objective realities; that the validities of quotes are inescapably constrained by, or contingent upon, contemporary modes of thought, standards of reasoning, epistemic principles, moral ideals and the like, which necessitate a postmodernist โ€œattitude of skepticism, irony, or rejection toward grand narratives, ideologies, and various tenets of universalism, including objective notions of reason, human nature, social progress, moral universalism, absolute truth, and objective realityโ€; and that many quotes are not so much amenable to any positivist-empiricist conception of science, mathematics, reason, logic or the laws of physics as they are to the pragmatic, utilitarian, emotional, psychological, existential, phenomenological, spiritual and metaphysical aspects of life, let alone the ontological and epistemological aspects of being.

Nevertheless, all things being equal, any quote that can also possess or exhibit scientific, mathematical, empirical and/or logical validity or truth will tend to be more reliable, abiding, cogent, authentic, compelling, defensible, comprehensive and/or universal. However, if (one were to believe or insist that) scientific truth, or any truth for that matter, is merely one sort of truth and therefore not to be singularly believed, especially privileged or taken for granted, and if everything is a matter of opinion or view relative to differences or divergences in perception and consideration, then there can be no universal, objective truth or logical yardstick. Instead, each viewpoint holds its own truth or validity. Hilary Whitehall Putnam, an American philosopher, mathematician and computer scientist with significant contributions to philosophy of mind, philosophy of language, philosophy of mathematics and philosophy of science, warns that those who adopt certain forms of relativism put themselves in a highly compromised and untenable position in which it is impossible to believe or admit that one is in error, since if there is no truth beyond oneโ€™s belief or opinion that something is true, then one cannot hold oneโ€™s beliefs or opinions to be false or mistaken, not to mention that relativizing truth to individuals demolishes the distinction between truth and belief.

Therefore, SoundEagle would like to encapsulate all of the abovementioned issues as well as the ensuing matters by coining a brand new term:

The Quotation Fallacy can be defined as any error or defect that weakens the construction, interpretation or treatment of a quotation as a consequence of invalid or faulty reasoning; intentional manipulation or misrepresentation; unintentional carelessness or ignorance; misleading notion or view; and mistaken belief or attribution.

Overall, the cognitive and social influences on forming judgements and making decisions in relation to interpreting and using quotations are far-reaching. Given that quotes are so often tossed around conversations, sprinkled in writings, and endlessly circulated in social media, the Quotation Fallacy is indeed very pervasive in everyday life and its concomitant human interactions, to the extent that people routinely and unintentionally commit this fallacy with impunity by being inadequately cognizant of, or accountable to, the effects and ramifications resulting from their desire to appropriate, perpetuate or reinforce particular views, sentiments or ideologies associated with certain quotes, which they render as personal flags, signature blocks, customized messages or memorable catchphrases to invoke inspirations or philosophical thoughts, and which they conscript as neologisms, truisms, dictums, epigrams, mottos, axioms, proverbs, mantras, slogans or manifestos to mobilize opinions, influence social dynamics, alter social discourses or bend social outcomes in countless situations.

In the Quotation Fallacy, the causes, effects and ramifications of misusing, misjudging or misinterpreting quotes, however invisible, unchecked and unacknowledged they may have been, can also include those arising from ethnocentrism, confirmation bias (also called confirmatory bias or myside bias), selective perception, selective exposure, Semmelweis reflex (or Semmelweis effect), anchoring (or focalism), anecdotal evidence, illusory correlation, irrelevant conclusion (also known as ignoratio elenchi, false conclusion or missing the point), faulty generalization, hasty generalization, jumping to conclusions (officially the jumping conclusion bias, and also called the inference-observation confusion), fundamental attribution error (also known as the correspondence bias or attribution effect), group attribution error, subjective validation (also known as personal validation effect), self-deception, self-serving bias, hindsight bias (also called the knew-it-all-along effect or creeping determinism), belief bias, belief perseverance, illusory truth effect (also known as the truth effect, the illusion-of-truth effect, the reiteration effect, the validity effect, and the frequency-validity relationship), illusion of validity, outcome bias, historian’s fallacy, quoting out of context (also known as contextomy or quote mining), cherry picking (also called suppressing evidence, or the fallacy of incomplete evidence), begging the question, circular reasoning, Bulverism, prooftexting, association fallacy (including guilt by association and honour by association), fallacy of illicit transference (including fallacy of composition and fallacy of division), slippery slope argument, continuum fallacy, splitting (also called black-and-white thinking or all-or-nothing thinking), false dilemma (also known as false dichotomy, fallacy of bifurcation, black-or-white fallacy), false analogy, divine fallacy (also known as argument from incredulity or personal incredulity), moralistic fallacy and naturalistic fallacy.

In short, the abovementioned heuristics, effects, biases, tendencies and fallacies stem from simple, intuitive, efficient rules, measures or schemas that people routinely use to judge and decide, insofar as they are mental shortcuts that largely involve concentrating on one facet of a complex problem and ignoring others. Whilst these rules or mental strategies may suffice under most circumstances, they can often lead people to commit systematic deviations from logic, probability, rationality, or even decency and morality, causing various errors in judgements and decisions. These errors can detrimentally affect not only peopleโ€™s choices in quotations but also their choices in matters like valuing a house, marrying a spouse, evaluating a person, appraising a situation, choosing an investment, or determining the outcome of a legal case.

Philosophy, cognitive science, logical inquiries, sound reasonings and self-appraisals can show us the pitfalls and misconceptions in not only how we live, choose, think and write but also how we quote. In conclusion, whilst we invariably gravitate towards choosing only certain quotations for their potency in representing, accentuating or validating our personalities, identities and beliefs so as to uphold or disseminate preferred views and favoured ideas, we should be aware that our opinions or reasonings involved in the selection and judgement of quotations can be imperfect and prone to the Quotation Fallacy.

Without further delay, SoundEagle hereby invites you to relish the following quotes in the hope that you will be much more careful when seeing, hearing or using quotes, even in the case of the most familiar or accepted kinds, so that you can consistently approach them with more reservations and deeper understanding, but with fewer encumbrances and misconceptions of any kind, including the sorts of mistakes in reasoning that arise from, or result in, the mishandling of the content and context of any quote.

SoundEagle in Quotation Fallacy and Fantasy
็–พ ้ขจ ็Ÿฅ ๅ‹ ่‰
ๆ˜ ๆ—ฅ ่พจ ่ช  ่‡ฃ
ๅ‹‡ ๅคซ ๅฎ‰ ่ญ˜ ็พฉ
ๆ™บ ่€… ๅฟ… ๆ‡ท ไป

Only the strong and sincere can bear hardship and turmoil.
Only the wise, not the valiant, can know righteousness and cherish benevolence.

SoundEagle in ็–พ้ขจ็Ÿฅๅ‹่‰
Live a good life.Life Cycle
If there are gods and they are just, then they will not care how devout you have been, but will welcome you based on the virtues you have lived by.
If there are gods, but unjust, then you should not want to worship them.
If there are no gods, then you will be gone, but will have lived a noble life that will live on in the memories of your loved ones.
Sound, Society and Environment
Too often we enjoy the comfort of opinion without the discomfort of thought.
SoundEagle in Use WITH Caution Or Not At All
For those who do believe, no proof is necessary.
For those who don’t, no proof is possible.
SoundEagle in Art, Aphorism and Paramusic
What we do for ourselves dies with us.
What we do for others and the world, remains and is immortal.
SoundEagle in Sound, Society and Environment
A belief is not merely an idea the mind possesses.
It is an idea that possesses the mind.
Transhuman, Posthuman, Neurotechnology, Neuroengineering, Neural Networks, Neuroscience, Memory Transplant, Augmentation and Reprogramming
Ability is what you are capable of doing.
Motivation determines what you do.
Attitude determines how well you do it.
Pro-Environment Perspective
The farther backward you can look,
the farther forward you will see.
Instrumental Perspective
An ounce of prevention is better than ten pounds of cure.
Pro-Animal/Plant Perspective
Nothing is easier than self-deceit.
For what each man wishes, that he also believes to be true.
Spiritual Perspective
We don’t see things as they are;
we see them as we are.
The method of science is to begin with questions, not with answers, least of all with value judgements.

The scientific method as a cyclic or iterative process
Science is dispassionate inquiry and therefore cannot take over outright any ideologies “already formulated in everyday life”, since these are themselves inevitably traditional and normally tinged with emotional prejudice.
Facing the Noise & Music - Monthly Blogging Event and Challenge with Preface, Issues and The Model
Sweeping all-or-none, black-and-white judgements are characteristic of totalitarian attitudes and have no place in science, whose very nature is inferential and judicial.
SoundEagle in Art, Science, Observation, Research, Development, Biomimicry, Biomimetics and Biomorphism
Philosophy, cognitive science, logical inquiries, sound reasonings and self-appraisals can show us the pitfalls and misconceptions in not only how we live, choose, think and write but also how we quote.
SoundEagle in Live Choose Think Write Quote
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98 comments on “The Quotation Fallacy โ€œ๐Ÿ’ฌโ€

  1. WOW that’s a lot of GIFs lol. And work. I’d give you a like just for that! ๐Ÿ˜‰

    Liked by 6 people

    • Hello Jason! Thank you for clicking the “Like” button and commenting on the graphics. Apart from what you term as “GIFs”, SoundEagle is quite curious to know what you thought of the textual parts of this post, which are just as plentiful and engaging.

      Liked by 2 people

      • I’m always impressed when someone can put that many in! It’s a busy work week, but the weekend is near!

        Liked by 2 people

      • Thank you for your reply. SoundEagle hopes that you are impressed by not just the quantity but also the quality of the graphics. For your information, each of these graphics can be commented on by clicking or touching it to activate its own comment section, which will “float” on top of the post.

        May you have a lovely weekend, Jason! SoundEagle looks forward to savouring your thoughts or comments on the textual portions of this post after a weekend of substantive incubation, rumination and/or rejuvenation. ๐Ÿ˜‰

        Liked by 3 people

      • By the way, please be informed that SoundEagle has had the opportunity to visit your mother’s website bearing many of her oeuvres.

        Liked by 1 person

  2. Reblogged this on Philosophy 12 and commented:

    Philosophy and logical inquiries can show us the pitfalls in not only how we live, think and write but also how we quote.

    Liked by 2 people

  3. […] Posted by SoundEagle ⋅ October 18, 2017 ⋅ Leave a comment Filed Under  Affect Heuristic, Author Bias, Cognitive Bias, Confirmation Bias, Genetic Fallacy, Halo Effect, Misquotation, Quotation Fallacy Philosophy and logical inquiries can show us the pitfalls in not only how we live, think and write b… […]

    Liked by 2 people

  4. I totally agree with you. I have little to say considering how well this is written and just how much ground it covers. Most people aren’t critical thinkers, or they simply don’t want to think, there is some comfort in having certain perceptions and views and in some cases even examinaning those can make the individual feel like they are engaging in something that threatens their sense of identity or meaning. Auto-thinking/judging is also not that taxing on our mental resources, it fits in perfectly in our constantly busy and distracted lives, pragmatic so to speak but I wonder if it is for the best. I don’t think it is, little good can come from being not being critical thinkers I think. Thanks for referring me to your post, it was fun.

    Liked by 9 people

  5. I totally agree with you. I have little to say considering how well this is written and just how much ground it covers. Most people aren’t critical thinkers, or they simply don’t want to think, there is some comfort in having certain perceptions and views and in some cases even examinaning those can make the individual feel like they are engaging in something that threatens their sense of identity or meaning. Auto-thinking/judging is also not that taxing on our mental resources, it fits in perfectly in our constantly busy and distracted lives, pragmatic so to speak but I wonder if it is for the best. I don’t think it is, little good can come from being not being critical thinkers I think. Thanks for referring me to your post, it was fun.z

    Liked by 3 people

    • Hello there! For some reason, your comment is duplicated. It seems that you have somehow submitted the comment twice. How keen of you!

      Thank you, Macxermillio, for giving your feedback on some of the central issues discussed in this post. Your observation that “there is some comfort in having certain perceptions and views and in some cases even examining those can make the individual feel [as if] they are engaging in something that threatens their sense of identity or meaning” is particularly pertinent and resonating, at least to the extent that people are often their own worst enemies, being hampered, confined and stymied by their own demons, beliefs, ignorance, inertias, mindsets, fears, bigotries, insecurities, follies and foibles, in spite of, or even because of, their humanity, culture and upbringing. This very special post has cited many terms and examples that encapsulate some of the commonest pitfalls in human perceptions and behaviours, many of which routinely evade our attention and conscious control, even in the mere act of choosing, reading or using a quote. Hence, the Quotation Fallacy is always upon us, impinging and seeping into our lives in various ways. All in all, it is indeed quite difficult to live a well examined life, which is neither a high priority nor an achievable goal for most folks, even though such a priority or goal has become more paramount and essential, considering the urgency of many mounting global issues, which will be analysed and discussed in forthcoming posts.

      Given your interests and penchants, SoundEagle would hereby like to recommend to you a related post published just prior to this post. It is a lengthy and multifaceted showcase of ๐Ÿ‘โ€ Optical Illusions ๐Ÿ‘โ€๐Ÿ—จโ‡๏ธ๐Ÿ˜ตโœณ๏ธ๐Ÿ‘€ in their various forms and manifestations.

      Liked by 2 people

  6. thanks for sharing this link – and wow – you are quite the scholar dear sound eagle – I only skimmed this and found it to be so interesting. Really like the image for the ongoing process of the sci method… and you are an artist too. whoa…. quite a mix of gifts you have.
    And yes, I see what you mean about the straight layout.

    Liked by 7 people

  7. Excellent post. And always remember what Moe Howard once said to his brother and fellow Stooge, Curly: “Curly, if you quote me again without giving proper references, I’m gonna sue ya’, ya’ bastard, ya’!” ๐Ÿ™‚

    Liked by 7 people

    • Thank you, Jeff, for providing your very first feedback over here. How well you remember the three stooges! Apart from the cartoon that reminds you of what Moe said to Curly, what do you think of the choice of quotes being presented in this post? Is there one that is particularly resonating with your ethos?

      Liked by 2 people

  8. Thanks SoundEagle. And you are writing a great blog ๐Ÿ‘โค๏ธ๐Ÿ‘Œ

    Liked by 6 people

    • Hi TechFlax! Thank you for your visit and compliment, though it would be far more illuminating if you could clarify further as to what aspects of this blog you consider to be great. SoundEagle is greatly amused that we both clicked the button to follow each other’s blog almost at the same time (separated by less than one second).

      Judging by the contents of your blog, you are certainly very savvy in certain aspects of computer technology. It is quite clear that your technological prowess is matched by your eagerness to help others and the clarity in your explanations via the posts published on your blog. Well done!

      Liked by 1 person

  9. A brilliant post, both informative and insightful. Even, or shall I say especially, the Bible has been the subject of misquotes. I love the Marcus Aurelius quote. Thank you for taking such care in putting it together.

    Liked by 5 people

    • Hi pjlazos! SoundEagle is delighted by your visit and compliment. Unless advised by you to the contrary, SoundEagle can safely assume from your previous feedback that the Marcus Aurelius quote is your most favourite of all the quotes contained in this post, which has become even longer and better.

      You are very welcome to demonstrate in another comment how the Bible has been the subject of misquotations, which can be of considerable interests to some readers here.

      Happy November to you very soon!

      Liked by 2 people

      • First, All the many iterations make it impossible that it has been interpreted correctly by everyone; second, the Dead Sea Scrolls demonstrate that information has systematically been removed (as in the 4th century during the Council of Nicene), especially the books by and references to women; and third, the Our Father was translated from the Aramaic in a way most favorable to men as the words in Aramaic translate to something more gender neutral. Just sayin’.

        Liked by 2 people

      • Thank you, pjlazos, for your summary on the subject matters of biblical misquotations arising from versional iterations, factional politics, gender inequality, as well as translational errors and discrepancies.

        Regardless of those issues, do you have your own favourite quotations from the Bible?

        Liked by 2 people

      • Love thy neighbor as thyself. ๐Ÿ˜˜

        Liked by 2 people

  10. SoundEagle, how do you find the time to write so prolifically? This is such a long post! It’s very good though.

    Liked by 4 people

    • Hello Marie! I hope that you have been quite rejuvenated to face a new week in good spirit as 2017 ushers in November, the penultimate month.

      As you are probably very well aware by now, SoundEagle tries to achieve a good synergy in presenting and balancing many diverse and complementary components, not just those pertaining to writing, as this website, whilst not lacking in textual information by any means, is also laden with graphics and multimedia as well as styling elements corresponding to thematic or topical requirements.

      Please be informed that you may come across certain post or page in which a menu containing internal links is available so that you can click on the links to jump quickly to different sections of the post or page.

      Hovering (with a mouse cursor or by other means) over a hyperlinked text or image may bring up a tool tip showing you additional information. So, it pays to hover on any item of interest to obtain extra information. Please enjoy to your heart’s content.

      Liked by 2 people

      • I am impressed that you are able to cover so much material on your blog. It just gets difficult to really enjoy it thoroughly because there is so much. Far be it from me to advise you on how to present material/topics, but I quite like short and sweet rather than long to the point where you end up skipping quite a lot of it, just to get to the end, and thereby perhaps missing something really interesting. I’m not criticising the way you present, as that’s entirely up to you (after all, it is your blog), but for me personally I would be more inclined to read every word if the posts were shorter. Your technical genius and knowledge cannot be challenged though. I hope you are not offended by anything I have said here because truly, none of what I have said was written to cause offence.:)

        Liked by 3 people

      • Hi Marie, SoundEagle is both delighted and reassured by your earnest feedback, which amply reveals your caring and thoughtful nature. Thank you! ๐Ÿ™‚

        It is inescapable but understandable that people have preferences regarding the purpose, design, layout and contents of a website or blog, especially a multidisciplinary one laden with multimedia and multitudinousness. Thus, one should not be surprised that the atypical platform rendered by SoundEagle might not be everybodyโ€™s cup of tea. Nevertheless, for those who care to explore this website with an open mind, they will be richly rewarded and even surprised. They will soon learn that there is considerable diversity in both style and content to satisfy a wide range of readers. For those who yearn for the short and sweet (but not the quick and dirty), they may opt for savouring SoundEagleโ€™s poems concerning a variety of topics and accessible at https://soundeagle.wordpress.com/tag/poem/ before graduating or acclimatizing to something lengthier or weightier. Please enjoy! ๐Ÿ™‚

        Liked by 3 people

    • Hi Marie! This post has become even longer since your last visit, because SoundEagle appended the following statements to a particularly dense paragraph to enhance and complete the discussion there:

      In short, the abovementioned heuristics, effects, biases, tendencies and fallacies stem from simple, intuitive, efficient rules, measures or schemas that people routinely use to judge and decide, insofar as they are mental shortcuts that largely involve concentrating on one facet of a complex problem and ignoring others. Whilst these rules or mental strategies may suffice under most circumstances, they can often lead people to commit systematic deviations from logic, probability, rationality, or even decency and morality, causing various errors in judgements and decisions. These errors can detrimentally affect not only peopleโ€™s choices in quotations but also their choices in matters like valuing a house, marrying a spouse, evaluating a person, appraising a situation, choosing an investment, or determining the outcome of a legal case.

      Liked by 2 people

      • I think people would do well to follow their own intuition as in my experience, it is nearly always right for them in their own situation. Quotations are great and form many ‘Aha!’ moments, but are not necessarily the way to go in any given situation. But they (quotes) can enlighten, clarify and even add deep insight to something that someone is grappling/struggling or even just wants a different take on – it doesn’t mean that they necessarily want to use it as a bargaining or a conclusive tool in house purchase, matrimonial matters or even trying to figure out someone’s personality.
        As a matter of interest, why do you always refer to yourself in the 3rd person and never ‘I’? – Just curious, although my intuition tells me that you wish to remain something of a mystery.:))

        Liked by 2 people

      • Hello Marie! Thank you for your well-considered response. We are basically in agreement, though SoundEagle has detected a potential misreading of the newly appended statements, based on the presence of the sentence in your response: โ€œit doesnโ€™t mean that they necessarily want to use it [the quote] as a bargaining or a conclusive tool in house purchase, matrimonial matters or even trying to figure out someoneโ€™s personality.โ€

        By rereading the newly appended statements (and if necessary, other portions of the post) more carefully, you will see that the heuristics, effects, biases, tendencies and fallacies stemming from peopleโ€™s intuitions or mental shortcuts, not the quotes or quotations per se, can cause various errors in judgements and decisions affecting their choices in quotations and other matters in their lives. In other words, it is not their use or misuse of some quote(s) โ€œas a bargaining or a conclusive tool in house purchase, matrimonial matters or even trying to figure out someoneโ€™s personalityโ€ that leads people astray. Rather, it is the cognitive and social influences on forming judgements and making decisions in conjunction with peopleโ€™s susceptibility to the abovementioned heuristics, effects, biases, tendencies and fallacies that lead people astray.

        As for the curious matter of SoundEagle addressing itself in the third person, a thorough reading of SoundEagleโ€™s โ€œAboutโ€ page can throw some light on what kind of creature SoundEagle has been.

        Liked by 2 people

      • Happy November to you, Marie! Since you intimated that you โ€œquite like short and sweet rather than longโ€, SoundEagle would like to provide a pithy response to your earlier comment. Extracted from the penultimate paragraph of this post, the following sentence can be regarded as the short and sweet version of SoundEagleโ€™s much longer response:

        Philosophy, cognitive science, logical inquiries, sound reasonings and self-appraisals can show us the pitfalls and misconceptions in not only how we live, choose, think and write but also how we quote.
        SoundEagle in Live Choose Think Write Quote

        Liked by 2 people

      • Hello SoundEagle! I can see you have been thinking about what I said, and I also think that you have been thinking about me, which is nice. I like that pithy sentence – it says a lot! ๐Ÿ™‚
        I hope you’re having a good day.

        Liked by 2 people

      • Hello Marie! SoundEagle has installed a nice present for you just below the pithy sentence in the previous comment. In addition, you can also enjoy the large version of the same at the end of the post itself, knowing that this new surprise for you is the short and sweet fruit born of our interactions here. Feel free to click on both the small and large versions to see what happens next. ๐Ÿ™‚

        Liked by 2 people

      • SilentSparrow, apologies, I meant SoundEagle, thank you so much for this innovative present which I shall take delight in opening over the following days. May I ask a personal question? ๐Ÿ™‚

        Liked by 1 person

      • What is the personal question, Marie, apart from the one that you just asked SoundEagle, now arousing the curiosity of even the unicorn?

        Liked by 2 people

      • hahahahahaha …. I have looked on your ‘about’ page (as advised) to discover who or what you are, SoundEagle, and am none the wiser. So, the personal question is: who are you? Are you a person or a computer? Are you one or are you many? When you are not being SoundEagle, how would I recognise you? I realise that there are a few personal questions here, and hope that I get an answer to at least one of them.:)))) Please don’t be esoteric in your response, or I shall never visit you again …

        Liked by 2 people

      • Hello there, Marie! Please kindly click on both the small and large versions of the new graphic again to see what happens next, as SoundEagle has recently added some message there for you, in case the message was not yet available on your first visit. ๐Ÿ™‚

        It is clear that the one personal question of Marie is in fact four, which are then followed by a sentence that any reasonable person can perceive to be a form of palpable threat, coercion or ultimatum. Given that you have bestowed or entertained such a gesture or stance, and that your previous comment could be your final or penultimate one, SoundEagle is hereby bidding you goodbye and wish you all the best in your future endeavours and encounters. ๐Ÿ™‚

        Liked by 2 people

      • Aww don’t be like that SoundEagle … :))

        Liked by 2 people

      • SoundEagle is one person.

        Hence, at least two of your four questions have been answered. Please be reminded that this is at least twice the quantity originally intended by you. ๐Ÿ™‚

        Liked by 2 people

      • I’ve only now seen the whole of your answer SoundEagle, I missed the top bit where you say you are one person first time round. Thanks for the information – you’re very kind. I was only joking about not visiting you again … you knew that, didn’t you? :)))

        Liked by 2 people

      • SoundEagle cannot be certain whether you were serious or joking for the reasons already mentioned, plus the fact that there is little or no indication of any sort that you have warmed to what you saw and read at SoundEagleโ€™s โ€œAboutโ€ page, for you have neither clicked the โญ๏ธ Like button nor left any comment there, in conjunction with the fact that there is still no clear sign that you have clicked on both the small and large versions of the new graphic to reveal what SoundEagle has attentively installed for you in two different formats, where, hopefully, you will remember to scroll down to reveal everything, including the option to comment there. ๐Ÿ™‚

        Liked by 2 people

      • I’m confused! I thought I had clicked on the ‘new graphic’ – but it seems I haven’t. Never mind – I really don’t know what to say. Ummm …I was joking – sorry if it wasn’t immediately apparent – things get lost in translation. Perhaps you’d like to spell it out for me what you’ve left, or if not, then that’s such a shame to miss out like that. Thanks!:)

        Liked by 3 people

      • As mentioned, Marie, it is a simple matter of clicking or touching (if you have a touch screen) both the small and large versions of the new graphic to reveal the linked contents in two different versions respectively. Remember to scroll vertically to reveal everything there since the presented contents cannot fit inside the whole screen. Even if you had indeed visited the two versions earlier, there are now extra information not hitherto available. ๐Ÿ™‚

        Liked by 1 person

      • Good morning SoundEagle! How are you? ๐Ÿ™‚ I can’t help but notice that you have visited a couple of my other blogs today – thank you so much for all those likes. That has made me very happy.โคโค

        Liked by 2 people

      • Good morning to you, Marie! It is delightful to be informed that you have been feeling upbeat after SoundEagle took the journey of visiting all of your blogs, especially the other two recently. Thank you for wishing SoundEagle a wonderful day. Let’s hope that you continue to feel happy throughout this weekend, and to have the mood or inspiration to find great satisfaction in whatever you choose to do or fulfil.

        Indeed, having more than one blog is something else that we have in common, an indication that we have diverse interests. Should your time permit during this weekend, SoundEagle would like to invite you to visit and enjoy โœฟโ€ Queensland Orchid International โ€โœฟ to your heart’s content, where, hopefully, you can discover some lovely surprises and feel very happy.

        Meanwhile, SoundEagle is in the process of getting a very significant post ready for publishing within a week. All will be revealed . . . . .

        Liked by 2 people

      • What a joy to hear from you SoundEagle! And all of what you wish me in your first paragraph, I wish the same for you.:) I’m all for feeling happy, and I will put aside some time to visit QOI this weekend.
        A significant post huh? Intrigued – no less! :))
        I hope the revelations won’t make me blush … :))))

        Liked by 2 people

      • In addition, SoundEagle has left you a special comment accessible only at the abovementioned linked contents, where you will find an entirely separate comment section in which to write your own comment(s) or reply to existing comment(s).

        Liked by 2 people

      • Good morning SoundEagle. I noticed that you’ve visited again and that was such a lovely surprise. Thank you and have a wonderful day! ๐Ÿ™‚

        Liked by 2 people

      • You are very welcome, Marie! ๐Ÿ™‚

        Liked by 2 people

  11. The origins of lots of quotations are difficult to pinpoint. People like to attribute clever quotes to Einstein, Twain, Wilde, etc. since this would look better than attributing them to some unknown nobody. Even authoritative sources like Oxford and Bartlett’s contain a large number of mistakes. Quote Investigator (a website) is rather good since it tries to track down the origin of the quotes they investigate. Unfortunately, I have also found some errors there.

    The biggest source of misinformation regarding quotes (and their origins) today is, of course, the Internet. You can find a huge number of misquotations and misattributions in social media and “quotes” websites

    That’s why when I post quotes, I seldom use a “Quote” book or website as a reference. Normally, when I find an interesting passage from a book that I read, I’d quote it. Sometimes, when I see an interesting quote from a quote book, I try my best to find the original source. If I can’t find the original source, then I most likely won’t post it.

    Liked by 4 people

    • Hello Edmark! First of all, SoundEagle would like to wish you a very happy November!

      Indeed, we both are quite bothered by the challenges and problems surrounding misquotations. Until the advent of some authoritative or definitive source(s) from which the public can reliably cite the sources of some quotations, the most reliable means for achieving responsible quoting is to obtain a desired quotation right from the horseโ€™s mouth, to witness the quoted passage printed on the original published material, or better still, to have something to be quoted written and autographed by the writer, or to get it authenticated by the author or their representative agent.

      Misquotation is only one of the many issues characterizing the Quotation Fallacy. Whilst misquotation is the one issue that can be treated by practicing due deligence in checking the source of a quotation, the other issues highlighted in this post are far more numerous and difficult to (re)solve.

      Somehow, your full name or blog name, being Edmark M. Law, has prompted SoundEagle to coin another brand new term:

      The Law of Quotation Edmark

      You are cordially invited to read from the beginning of this post, which SoundEagle has recently improved and also incorporated a little surprise awaiting your discovery.

      Like

  12. That’s a fantastic post. So much intelligent logic and critical analysis. So much wisdom. And colorful creativity too.

    Liked by 5 people

    • Hi Mathias! SoundEagle is delighted to hear from you as it has been quite a while since we last interacted. Meanwhile, rereading the start of this post is recommended, given that it has been improved and extended since your previous visit. Thank you for taking the time and effort to peruse and comment on the post. Should you have further thoughts or recommendations on any aspects of the post, please feel free to leave more comments. Besides, SoundEagle cannot help wondering which quote(s), from the ones stylishly presented above, you consider to be your favourite(s).

      Please be informed that SoundEagle is very impressed by your Cooperatives in Japan (Article Series) dealing with the cooperative organizational form from the perspectives of social economy and industrial democracy. Happy November to you!

      Liked by 1 person

  13. You have written exceptionally well, yup today quotes have become a craze, but the original source of the quote is misquoted. I write my own quotations and use them in my posts. I am also a quote lover. Love strong words…and now have started to make my own.

    Liked by 4 people

  14. Iโ€™m a sucker for quotes and I like your style. ๐Ÿ˜‰

    Liked by 4 people

    • Thank you, RhapsodyBoheme, for your visit and comment. Perhaps SoundEagleโ€™s style significantly appeals to your rhapsodic audacity and bohemian sensibility! ๐Ÿ™‚

      By the way, which quote(s) in this post do you consider to be most appealing to you, and why?

      Liked by 1 person

      • Well actually there are several and I relate to most. If I had to pick one that stands out and is relevant at this time, it would be “What we do for ourselves dies with us. What we do for others and the world, remains and is immortal”.
        I pick this one for several reasons and in a world that has become so fast paced, life is often survival of the fittest. This requires many to focus their attention to be placed on only themselves. It causes people to forget the bigger picture and be selfish. Not all learn that we receive so much more when we give and not all realize that there is a picture much greater than we. I could go on and on about the chain reaction and all the things set in motion by such behavior and what it leads to, but we each have to discover our own journey and find our own path when the time is right and we are ready to welcome the teacher,

        Liked by 2 people

  15. Lovely project and worth considering to become a co-author at my lifestyle magazine From Guestwriters.
    As you say the best and secure quotes are those we get from our readings, selecting a passage from a book or writing of interest but also what we hear people saying themselves (e.g. on television). For that last one when people saying something freely in the media it is not always sure it are there own words but still represents their thoughts are beliefs.

    Congratulations also for the pictures.

    Liked by 4 people

  16. The ultra-articulate style and artistic talent of SoundEagle is
    without a doubt lengthy, yet a pleasure to read ๐Ÿ™‚ I’ve clicked
    through on a few favourite quote/images. Also love the one
    pertaining to the pertinence of science beginning with questions
    instead of answers… Wonderful post! ๐Ÿ™‚ ๐Ÿ’œ Jackie@KWH

    Liked by 4 people

  17. You know the (alleged) Yogi Berra quote, “I didn’t say half the things I said”?

    Liked by 4 people

    • Hi Ellen! It is a rare sight and welcomed delight to find you here, quite unexpectedly. ๐Ÿ™‚

      Yogi Berra is certainly an interesting case with which to demonstrate misquotation, to the extent that the origin and date of first occurrence for most Yogiisms is indeterminate or unknown. In any case, you seem to be quite well-informed by, or well-versed in, Yogiisms, at least with respect to this particular one. Apart from the one you quoted as โ€œI didnโ€™t say half the things I said.โ€, there are at least five other variants, according to Quote Investigator:

      • I really didnโ€™t say everything I said.
      • I didnโ€™t say everything I said.
      • I never said half the things I said.
      • Half the things I said, I never said them.
      • I never said most of the things I said.

      A quotation in a foreign language adds another layer of complexity. Your disdain for machine translation is obvious when you stated โ€œDo I distrust Google translations? You bet your mistranslated ass I do.โ€ in your post about British food. Now, please kindly bear with SoundEagle to experience your new level of distrust or disdain after getting Google to translate the first quote in this post, which happens to be a Chinese poem: โ€œ็–พ้ขจ็Ÿฅๅ‹่‰๏ผŒๆ˜ๆ—ฅ่พจ่ช ่‡ฃ๏ผŒๅ‹‡ๅคซๅฎ‰่ญ˜็พฉ๏ผŒๆ™บ่€…ๅฟ…ๆ‡ทไปใ€‚โ€ The result of the translation is as follows:

      Breeze known fresh grass, faint date distinguish Chengchen, Yong Fu An sense of righteousness, wise men must be Renren.

      Do you know of any Chinese language expert who can properly translate the first quote? Perhaps the prospective expert could kindly leave the translation in the comment section of this post.

      As a matter of curiosity, which quote(s) in this post do you consider to be most relevant or appealing to you, and why?

      Liked by 2 people

  18. Great article. I picked up a new word: tendentious, which could possibly be the word of the century.

    Liked by 4 people

  19. This is way cool! Love it. Great blog!!!

    Liked by 3 people

  20. Hey SoundEagle, just thought I’d send some of my UNKNOWN and UNFAMOUS quotes your way, and see if you’re interested in more. “I got a million of em.” (Jimmy Durante)
    rawgod speaks:

    1) The error in terror is the care in scare.
    2) Do unto others only those things you are willing to allow others to do unto you. (revisiting the Golden Rule.)
    3) Know thyself
    Integrate thyself.
    Be thyself
    Be
    (The formula for getting to be one, self.)
    4) If one teach two we are thrice as many…
    Patience, till we are the last.
    5) If there is a god, he/she/it is an absentee landlord.
    But there is no god, so live like you are trying to create one.
    (Apparently a variation on the possible Marcus Aurelius quote mentioned in your
    blog, but I don’t remember ever having heard that one before.)

    Thanks for liking my comments. I myself avoid the “like” game most of the time. If I take the time to write a comment, the commentee will know if I like their words or not, lol.

    Liked by 3 people

  21. Oops, forgot one I wanted to offer you, and my computer shut down before I could add it:

    Live every moment of every day to create memories you will not forget, or regret.

    Only 999,994 to go, lol…

    Liked by 2 people

  22. I love that “Dear readers and followers as well as lovers and collectors … ” – just love the ambiguity! So dish the dirt on the number of ‘lovers’ lol

    Liked by 2 people

  23. Hey there! Sorry it took a while to get back to you, always very busy with work on weekends. Great post by the way, and here is the translation of the Chinese poem according to my girlfriend. (I’m just going to copy and paste what she messaged me)

    ็–พ้ฃŽ็ŸฅๅŠฒ่‰ means (only) strong wind can distinguish the strong grass.
    ๆ˜ๆ—ฅ่พฉๅฟ ่‡ฃ means (only) unstable/turbulent political situation can show the loyal minister/subordinate staff.
    ๅ‹‡ๅคซๅฎ‰็Ÿฅไน‰ how can a simply bold and muscular man ever understand benevolence and righteousness
    ๆ™บ่€…ๅฟ…ๆ€€ไป means only those with great wisdom have the merit of benevolence and righteousness

    In relation to the last characters in the 3rd and 4th line.
    ไน‰ and ไป. but when you translate them you should put them together. ไปไน‰ is from Confucianism and means benevolence ไปๆ…ˆ and righteousness ๆญฃไน‰.

    So it literally means only tough conditions can test how strong people are.
    And people who are only masculine and bold can never understand ไปไน‰, only people with great wisdom can.

    Hope this helps and all the best!

    Liked by 3 people

  24. No recent updates or itโ€™s my phone bugging..? ๐Ÿค—

    Liked by 3 people

  25. I use quotations almost daily on my blog to provide an “exclamation point” of sorts to my content. I verify the source first. If the quote serves the purpose but the author cannot be verified, I add the phrase “attributed to”. I do not use my post-ending quotes as validation of my message. They are there to be enjoyed or stimulate further thought.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Hello swabby429 (BlueJay)! It is illuminating to be informed of how you use and attribute quotes on your blog. ๐Ÿ™‚

      Assuming that SoundEagle has not misread part of your comment, there seems to be something unclear about your sentence “If the quote serves the purpose but the author cannot be verified, I add the phrase โ€œattributed toโ€.”, to the extent that if the author cannot be verified, then there is simply nobody who can be โ€œattributed toโ€. Perhaps you could elaborate further.

      As stated at the end of a long comment on your excellent post entitled โ€œKnaveโ€, SoundEagle was hoping to receive your feedback on the coinage and definition of the Quotation Fallacy, which you can locate in the middle portion of this post. In other words, SoundEagle would like to have some indication(s) from you about how well or comprehensive the coinage and definition of the Quotation Fallacy have captured, represented or encapsulated the complex issues discussed in the post with respect to what you have read and your own insights into such matters. Thank you in anticipation.

      Like

  26. What a terrific article, and thanks for spotlighting logical fallacies! Alas, in weak moments I sometimes wonder if my psychology degree (complete with a course in symbolic logic) is a blessing or a curse. I want to think clearly, but there are times (political arguments spring to mind) that it seems I am alone in this desire.

    I quite like author quotes, although I use them more as inspirational rays of sunshine than premises for arguments. And I have noticed many things attributed to Tolkien that I’m pretty sure he never said. Some can be blamed on the success of the films, but that’s akin to watching the movie instead of reading the book for a school report. It’s distressing to see the same sloppy standards used so widely by adults.

    At any rate, I try to use quotes to bring pleasure to people. There’s a beauty in a well-crafted sentence, and Tolkien, Chesterton, Twain, and Lewis (to name a few) had some pithy advice on both writing and living.

    Thanks again for sharing this post. ๐Ÿ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

  27. Great post on an often misused issue
    Nice range of quotes

    Liked by 1 person

  28. Thanks for your like of my post, “Love,” on Al Di La, on the words, “Beyond the beyond.” You are very kind.

    Liked by 1 person

  29. A lot of work went into this – congrats!! Some great gifs. It will make me more wary of using the wrong quote, and hopefully less lazy by substituting a quote for my own words! Thanks!!

    Liked by 1 person

  30. We learn this in school but I don’t think most of us care. However, this knowledge does allow me to view our “discussions” in Philosophy class with more humor. ๐Ÿ˜‰ Seriously, though, it is sad that in this day and age when we have so much knowledge and the tools with which to understand it at our disposal…we generally just dispose *of* it.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Hello! Should or could one address you here as โ€œsarasamomx5โ€? Happy mid-January!

      Thank you for your thoughtful feedback. According to your views or observations, what factors or issues are contributing to or causing the problem(s) as you described in your comment?

      By the way, please be informed that each of the images accompanying the quotations can be clicked or touched to reveal an entirely separate comment section in which to write your own comment(s) or reply to existing comment(s).

      It would be very nice to know which quote(s) in this post has or have the greatest impression or impact on you.

      Like

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